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Teaching-Focused Faculty

 
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Brokaw, James J., PhD, MPH

 

There is a growing recognition that medical education should be evaluated with the same rigor as biomedical science if we are to produce better health care providers. My current scholarly work is concentrated in two areas: The evaluation of curricular innovations in medical education and the development of graduate degree programs to train the next generation of anatomy teachers and educational researchers. I teach graduate courses in histology and embryology, direct the IU Center for Anatomical Sciences Education, and serve as the Vice-Chair for Education in the department.

 

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Byrd, Kenneth E., PhD

 

Anatomical and neuroanatomical correlates of function and/or behavior – fMRI/brain activation patterns during bruxing, masticatory biomechanics; neurophysiology of mastication; function/dysfunction of temporomandibular joint; interaction between central pattern generators in CNS and morphology of the craniofacial complex; neurotransmitter stimulation and inhibition of brainstem motoneurons and their morphological sequelae in the craniofacial complex.

 

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Deane, Andrew, PhD

As a paleoanthropologist, my research addresses questions related to ape and human evolution. Specifically, I am interested in the functional relationships between the mechanical loading associated with dietary and locomotor adaptations and hard and soft tissue anatomy, and what these relationships might reveal about the paleoebiology and evolution of fossil apes and early humans. The more accurate our interpretations of fossil ape and early human locomotor adaptations and diet, the greater the potential for that information to contribute answers to research questions about why these taxa evolved, what made them successful in some cases, and extinct in others, and the connection between diet and locomotion and the origins of the lineages of living apes and humans.

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McNulty, Margaret A., PhD

The McNulty Lab is involved in both basic science and educational research.
Basic science research interests revolve around bone and joint pathology. The McNulty lab uses both advanced imaging (e.g. micro-computed tomography) and histological techniques to evaluate changes in bones and joints secondary to various diseases and treatments. Current work involves projects focused on two specific areas: characterizing and understanding the mechanisms of arthritic changes secondary to chikungunya virus and evaluating the impact of bisphosphonate administration on the equine skeleton. 

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Seifert, Mark F., PhD

 

My research interests are in skeletal biology and include studies on how lipids, particularly omega-6 and omega-3 fatty acids, and flavenoids affect bone modeling and remodeling in normal and estrogen-deficiency conditions. I am also involved in studies utilizing rodent models of chronic renal disease to understand the pathophysiology of bone loss and vascular calcification during renal failure and how these conditions can be treated pharmacologically.

 

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Shew, Ronald L., PhD

 

My research interests are in PTHrP and neuropeptides, and uterine smooth muscle include studies on localization, effect and mechanism of action. I am also involved in studies involving education of basic science teaching.

 

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Wong, Donald, PhD

 

A central interest of our research is to understand how the brain processes complex sounds in generating auditory perception. Extracellular single-unit recording is used to analyze the functional organization of the mammalian auditory cortex. Neuroanatomical tract-tracing is employed to determine the anatomical connections of physiologically-identified regions. A computational neuroscience approach is further used to model single neurons with artificial neural-networks and signal-processing techniques.

 

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Department of Anatomy & Cell Biology | IU School of Medicine | 635 Barnhill Drive, MS 5035 | Indianapolis, IN 46202 | (317) 274-7494